Harriet Miller1

F, #100407, b. circa 1795, d. circa 1830
  • Birth*: circa 1795; Ballston, Saratoga Co., New York, U.S.A.; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Marriage*: circa 1817; Grantham Twp., Lincoln Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.; Principal=Levi Nickerson1
  • Death*: circa 1830; Malahide Twp., Elgin Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Married Name: circa 1817; Nickerson1

Family: Levi Nickerson b. c 1793, d. 16 Jan 1872

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Mary Nickerson1

F, #100408, b. circa 1797, d. 5 November 1841
  • Birth*: circa 1797; Hamilton Twp., Northumberland Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Marriage*: circa 1815; Grantham Twp., Lincoln Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.; Principal=Thomas Hodgkinson1
  • Death*: 5 November 1841; London, Middlesex Co., Canada West; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Married Name: circa 1815; Hodgkinson1

Family: Thomas Hodgkinson b. c 1796, d. May 1848

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Enos Nickerson1

M, #100409, b. circa 1799, d. 25 September 1873
  • Birth*: circa 1799; Hamilton Twp., Northumberland Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 25 January 1825; Lincoln Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.; Principal=Ann Westover1
  • Death*: 25 September 1873; Trenton, Dodge Co., Wisconsin, U.S.A.; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1

Family: Ann Westover b. c 1807, d. 12 Jan 1896

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Ann Westover1

F, #100410, b. circa 1807, d. 12 January 1896
  • Birth*: circa 1807; Grantham Twp., Lincoln Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 25 January 1825; Lincoln Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.; Principal=Enos Nickerson1
  • Death*: 12 January 1896; Trenton, Dodge Co., Wisconsin, U.S.A.; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Married Name: 25 January 1825; Nickerson1

Family: Enos Nickerson b. c 1799, d. 25 Sep 1873

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Eunice Nickerson1

F, #100411, b. 1802, d. 20 March 1873
  • Birth*: 1802; Hamilton Twp., Northumberland Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 28 February 1843; Southwold Twp., Elgin Co., Canada West; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.; Principal=Thomas Sprague1
  • Death*: 20 March 1873; Yarmouth Twp., Elgin Co., Ontario; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Married Name: 28 February 1843; Sprague1

Family: Thomas Sprague b. 6 Apr 1794, d. Apr 1866

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Thomas Sprague1

M, #100412, b. 6 April 1794, d. April 1866
  • Birth*: 6 April 1794; Chenango, Broome Co., New York, U.S.A.; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 28 February 1843; Southwold Twp., Elgin Co., Canada West; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.; Principal=Eunice Nickerson1
  • Death*: April 1866; Yarmouth Twp., Elgn Co., Canada West; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1

Family: Eunice Nickerson b. 1802, d. 20 Mar 1873

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Catherine Nickerson1

F, #100413, b. 14 December 1807, d. before 1861
  • Birth*: 14 December 1807; Hamilton Twp., Northumberland Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 30 July 1827; Malahide Twp., Elgin Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.; Principal=Robert L. McKenney1
  • Death*: before 1861; Bayham Twp., Elgin Co., Canada West; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Married Name: 30 July 1827; McKenney1

Family: Robert L. McKenney b. 9 Jun 1800, d. c 1841

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Robert L. McKenney1

M, #100414, b. 9 June 1800, d. circa 1841
  • Birth*: 9 June 1800; New York, U.S.A.; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 30 July 1827; Malahide Twp., Elgin Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.; Principal=Catherine Nickerson1
  • Death*: circa 1841; Grand Detour, Ogle Co., Illinois, U.S.A.; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1

Family: Catherine Nickerson b. 14 Dec 1807, d. b 1861

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

David Varien Nickerson1

M, #100415, b. 14 December 1807, d. 25 September 1887
  • Birth*: 14 December 1807; Hamilton Twp., Northumberland Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 31 January 1833; Malahide Twp., Elgin Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.; Principal=Jane McKenney1
  • Death*: 25 September 1887; Trenton, Dodge Co., Wisconsin, U.S.A.; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1

Family: Jane McKenney b. 18 Aug 1812, d. 1 Dec 1906

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Jane McKenney1

F, #100416, b. 18 August 1812, d. 1 December 1906
  • Birth*: 18 August 1812; Duanesburg, Montgomery Co., New York, U..A.; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 31 January 1833; Malahide Twp., Elgin Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.; Principal=David Varien Nickerson1
  • Death*: 1 December 1906; Trenton, Dodge Co., Wisconsin, U.S.A.; per family tree of BruceC_JohnsonJr on ancestry.ca, May 11 2019.1
  • Married Name: 31 January 1833; Nickerson1

Family: David Varien Nickerson b. 14 Dec 1807, d. 25 Sep 1887

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Daniel Johnson1

M, #100417, b. 28 February 1768, d. 14 February 1837
  • Birth*: 28 February 1768; Skenesborough, New York, U.S.A.; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 2 November 1789; Ernestown Twp., Lennox & Addington Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.; Principal=Zebiah Shorey1
  • Death*: 14 February 1837; Ernestown Twp., Bath, Lennox & Addington Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1

Family: Zebiah Shorey b. 19 May 1771, d. 11 Feb 1859

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Zebiah Shorey1

F, #100418, b. 19 May 1771, d. 11 February 1859
  • Birth*: 19 May 1771; Rehoboth, Bristol Co., Massachusetts, U.S.A.; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 2 November 1789; Ernestown Twp., Lennox & Addington Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.; Principal=Daniel Johnson1
  • Death*: 11 February 1859; Ernestown Twp., Lennox & Addington Co., Canada West; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1
  • Married Name: 2 November 1789; Johnson1

Family: Daniel Johnson b. 28 Feb 1768, d. 14 Feb 1837

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

James Johnson1

M, #100419, b. circa 1735, d. 27 May 1810
  • Birth*: circa 1735; Belfast, Antrim Co., Ireland; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1
  • Marriage*: circa 1765; U.S.A.; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.; Principal=Ann Catharine Pegg1
  • Death*: 27 May 1810; Ernestown Twp., Lennox & Addington Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1
  • Residence*: circa 1800; Conc 1 Lot 9, Ernestown Twp., Lennox & Addington Co., Upper Canada; "Lot 11, now a part of Bath, was owned by George McGinnis, half pay officer, who sold to Fairfield. No. 10, on which is situated most of the village of Bath, was occuppied by John Davy. No. 9 was owned by James Johnson, father of the celebrated *' Bill " Johnson, the traitor of 1812. The next was settled by Jeptlia Hawley, Esq." page 443 of "History of the Settlement of Upper Canada" by William Canniff, 1869.2

Family: Ann Catharine Pegg b. 1745, d. 22 Feb 1819

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.
  2. [S110] Unknown compiler, William Canniff.

Ann Catharine Pegg1

F, #100420, b. 1745, d. 22 February 1819
  • Birth*: 1745; Greenwich Twp., Sussex Co., New Jersey, U.S.A.; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1
  • Marriage*: circa 1765; U.S.A.; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.; Principal=James Johnson1
  • Death*: 22 February 1819; Ernestown Twp., Lennox & Addington Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1
  • Married Name: circa 1765; Johnson1

Family: James Johnson b. c 1735, d. 27 May 1810

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

William J. Johnson1,2

M, #100421, b. 1 February 1782, d. 17 February 1870

  • Birth*: 1 February 1782; Trois Riviere, Quebec; Date 1782 per Memorial. Date Feb 1 1782 & locaiton Trois Riviere, Quebec per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.2,3
  • Marriage*: 1807; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.; Principal=Sarah Ann Randolph2
  • Death*: 17 February 1870; Clayton, Jefferson Co., New York, U.S.A.; Date 1870 per Memoral. Date Feb 17 1870 & location Clayton, NY per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.
    Note: The name is spelled Johnson in the actual grave stone but Johnston in the Findagrave record???2,3
  • Burial*: 19 February 1870; Clayton Village Cemetery, Clayton, Jefferson Co., New York, U.S.A.; Findagrave: Name: William Johnston; Birth: 1782; Death: 1870 (aged 87-88); Burial: Clayton Village Cemetery, Clayton, Jefferson County, New York, USA; Memorial ID     92233763 (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/92233763/w-john)
    Note: Different spelling from the actual memorial!!!3
  • Residence: circa 1800; Conc 1 Lot 9, Ernestown Twp., Lennox & Addington Co., Upper Canada; "Lot 11, now a part of Bath, was owned by George McGinnis, half pay officer, who sold to Fairfield. No. 10, on which is situated most of the village of Bath, was occuppied by John Davy. No. 9 was owned by James Johnson, father of the celebrated *' Bill " Johnson, the traitor of 1812. The next was settled by Jeptlia Hawley, Esq." page 443 of "History of the Settlement of Upper Canada" by William Canniff, 1869.4
  • Residence*: circa 1810; Ernestown Twp., Bath, Lennox & Addinton Co., Upper Canada; "Bill Johnston spent his first 30 years as a loyal British subject. He was one of a dozen children born to British Loyalist parents [1] who fled the American Revolution in 1781 to settle in Upper Canada (now Ontario). As a boy, he helped carve a farm out of the primeval forest west of present-day Kingston. Starting when he was 16, he apprenticed to a local blacksmith for six years. At 22, he became a potash manufacturer, making use of the plentiful supply of ashes from burned forests. By 24, he captained his own schooner on eastern Lake Ontario. While he often carried legitimate cargo, he just as often smuggled tea and rum. He married an American, Ann Randolph, in 1807 or early 1808 and began raising a family on his farm west of Kingston, Ontario. After five years of smuggling, Bill amassed enough profit to buy a Kingston store valued at an estimated $12,000, a small fortune in that era. By 1812, at 30, he was a rather prosperous merchant." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Johnston_(pirate)5
  • Note: circa April 1812; Bath, Lennox & Addington Co., Upper Canada; "After his brother, Andrew, had entered the service, he (Bill) deserted to the United States. Even now it does not appear that the authorities of Kingston suspected his loyalty, for they desired that he should take his place in the ranks which his brother had forsaken. This, however, Bill would not do. The result was that a file of soldiers commanded by Sergeant Lockwood was sent to arrest Johnson, by order of the captain, Matthew Clark of Ernesttown. Upon the approach of the soldiers, Johnson shouted to Sergeant Lockwood, who had been his life-long playmate, 'I know what you are after; but you won't get me yet,' and immediately shut the door and turned the key. Lockwood, without hesitation, raised his musket, and with the butt knocked the door open, in time to see Bill escaping byt the back door. A close chase ensued into the back enclosure, and Lockwood succeeded in catching him by the leg as he was passing through a window. Johnson then submitted and was conveyed a prisoner to the guard house within the jail.
    After being confined for some time, he escaped by breaking the jail; probably aided by sympathizers, for a good many thought he was badly treated." The Tobey Book, page 56 & 57, this item written by Issac N. Wellington, local Brighton historian.6
  • Note*: circa July 1812; Presqu'ile Point, Newcastle, Northumberland Co., Upper Canada; "During this time (War of 1812) Grandfather Gibson spent the greater part of his time working and building a schooner for one of his sons on the shore in front of his dwelling (should kind Providence spare his boys to return from the War). He had the schooner nearly completed when a report was made to the American Government by spies that were continually coasting along the Canadian frontier that vessels were being built by the Government for war purposes. Consequently, Bill Johnson (the notorious land pirate as he was called) was sent by the American government to burn the boat. He came from Sackett's Harbour in what was called a revenue cutter boat, and with oars muffled, the crew came noiselessly up the shore at night, threw some inflammable substance on the vessel, ignited it and the boat was soon wrapped in flames from stem to stern, burning to ashes while standing on the stocks. While the boat was burning, the cutter was seen with 6 or 8 oars on either side dipping together into the water taking her departure." The Tobey Book, page 56, this item authored by Isaac M. Wellington, locak historian of Brighton.6
  • Note: circa October 1812; Presqu'ile Bay, Northumberland Co., Upper Canada; "Whatever may have been Johnson's feelings towards the British Government before, he now became a most determined enemy of his native country. He vowed that he should "be a thorn in Great Britain's side". When his goods and some property at Bath were confiscated he declared that he would get back all that he had lost. This occurrence took place sometime during
    the autumn of 1812. It would appear that Bill Johnson set out in a systematic manner to carry out his threats. Canniff related an
    incident concerning Thomas Parker: "During the War there were frequently boat loads of goods, consisting of liquors and other valuable articles passing up the bay and across the Carrying Place, thence to York. On one occasion Thomas Parker, who was engaged in the business left Kingston with a batteau laden with valuables for year. Johnson, who watched such events, saw Parker depart. While the latter made his way up the bay, Johnson proceeded in his craft around by the lake, and awaited Parker off Presqu'Ile. In due time, the batteau was seized by Johnson and his comrades, and taken to the other side. Parker being landed on Point Traverse, near Marysburgh." Johnson at one point seized government dispatches near Brighton.6
  • Note: circa 1813; Newcastle, Northumberland Co., Upper Canada; "Johnson at one point seized government dispatches near Brighton. At this time a company of Dragoons under Captain Stinson were on duty to carry dispatches between the Trent River, Smith's Creek, and Port Hope. On a certain occasion a dragoon by the name of Gardiner was carrying dispatches when he was suddenly seized by Johnson who deliberately took Gardiner with his horse to the lake shore. He shot the horse, placed the dispatch bag in his boat and then permitted the man to find his way on foot through the woods to report to his captain." The Tobey Book, pg. 57, this item written by Isaac M. Wellington, local Brighton historian.6
  • Note: between 1813 and 1814; Upper Canada; "The War of 1812 began with American attacks on Britain's colonies in Canada. In May 1813, the Kingston military commander ordered Bill Johnston arrested,[2] allegedly for spying. Johnston escaped and paddled to Sackets Harbor, New York, in a canoe. The British then confiscated his property. He vowed undying revenge on the British and pledged himself to the American commander of the United States Navy in Lake Ontario. For two years, Bill Johnston made war [3] in the Thousand Islands in a gig-a fast, light rowboat. Propelled by six oarsmen, this small craft gave him a distinct advantage in the shallow and tight waterways around the Thousand Islands. If trapped, Johnston's men could easily carry the boat across an island to escape. Through the warm months of 1813 and 1814, he spied on the British, attacked their supply boats, robbed mail couriers, burned ships, and participated in the battles of Sackets Harbor and Crysler's Farm. After the war, Bill and his family lived briefly in several upstate New York towns. They settled in Clayton in 1834. He established a waterfront shop and continued smuggling tea and rum to Canada. Ironically, the US revenue service paid him to spy on Canadian smugglers coming into the US." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Johnston_(pirate)5
  • Note: between 1837 and 1838; New York, U.S.A.; "In early December, 1837, a small band of men, led by former Toronto mayor, William Lyon Mackenzie rebelled against British rule. His small force was quickly defeated at Montgomery's Tavern, and Mackenzie fled to Navy Island, near the Canada-US border. While there, he proclaimed the Republic of Canada and attempted to recruit an army of Canadian republicans and American sympathizers. On 29 December, a band of British soldiers crossed the icy river and destroyed Mackenzie's supply ship, the Caroline, killing an American sailor. The Caroline raid enraged Johnston. He left his home and joined Mackenzie's forces. Mackenzie then appointed him admiral of the eastern navy, even though the rebels possessed no navy. In 1838, rebels based in the US, calling themselves either Patriots or Hunters, attacked Canada at least seven times. Johnston helped plan an attack on Upper Canada near Detroit led by Donald McLeod in February 1838. The same month, he organized an attack on Kingston and temporarily occupied a Canadian island. He aborted the latter invasion because the British learned of his plans." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Johnston_(pirate)5
  • Note: 30 May 1838; Wellesley Island, Jefferson Co., New York, U.S.A.; "Bill Johnston's most famous undertaking, the one that earned him his pirate moniker, occurred early on the morning of May 30, 1838. Following a plan Johnston hatched with Donald McLeod (a general in the Patriot army), they and twenty others, mostly Canadians, set out to capture the passenger steamer, the Sir Robert Peel. They intended to use the Peel to transport rebel troops to Canada. Shortly after midnight, the Peel docked at Wellesley Island to load firewood for its boilers. Johnston's men landed 500 yards downstream and set out through the woods towards the Peel. Nine men got lost in the dark. Undeterred, Johnston, McLeod and 11 others attacked the ship. They had hustled the 80 passengers and crew at gunpoint to the wharf. Johnston ordered the ship untied and it drifted downstream. Rebel leaders had promised to send men to help run the ship, but they failed to arrive. Since none of Johnston's men could restart the boilers, he ordered them to loot the ship and burn it. With cries of "Remember the Caroline," they set it aflame and retreated in their boats. American authorities soon arrested 13 of Johnston's pirate crew. A sympathetic jury acquitted the first man put on trial. The remaining prisoners were released for fear of the same result. Johnston remained at large and even issued a proclamation of war against Britain in which he admitted destroying the Peel. The British and American forces each sent a small naval force and army into the Thousand Islands searching for Johnston. For a brief time, the US allowed British vessels to search for Johnston in American waters, much to the chagrin of many New York citizens.[citation needed] (In mid-July 1838, the US asked the British to stay out, so angry were its citizens to see foreign warships in their waters. The search continued on both sides of the border.) Johnston knew every cave and secret glen in the archipelago. His children, especially his daughter Kate, smuggled him supplies throughout that summer. Despite months of effort, the searchers failed to find him and the forces involved were reduced." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Johnston_(pirate)5
  • Note: November 1838; Prescott, Leeds & Grenville Co., Upper Canada; Battle of the Windmill and Johnston's arrest: In November 1838, a force of 250 American hunter patriots crossed the St. Lawrence River at Ogdensburg, New York for an abortive attack on Prescott. After the attack failed on Prescott, the hunter patriots occupied the hamlet of Newport. Later known as the Battle of the Windmill, the invaders were forced to surrender after having been surrounded by British forces for five days. On the first day of the battle, Johnston ferried supplies to the Canadian shore and helped to refloat two rebel schooners that ran aground on the mud flats. Johnston surrendered to US authorities shortly after the Battle of the Windmill. He claimed he was tired of running. Johnston faced numerous charges for his rebel activities and the Peel raid. In many cases, juries refused to convict him. When he was jailed, he escaped when the mood struck him." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Johnston_(pirate)5
  • Note: 12 April 1853; Rock Island Lighthouse, Jefferson Co., New York, U.S.A.; "Johnston spent the remainder of his years as a smuggler and tavern owner. On 12 April 1853, Johnston was appointed as keeper of the Rock Island Lighthouse. He spent his last years in Clayton living in his son Samuel's hotel, the Walton House." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_Island_Light5

Family: Sarah Ann Randolph b. c 1792, d. 1858

  • Marriage*: 1807; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.; Principal=Sarah Ann Randolph2

Citations

  1. William Johnson per Memorial. William J. Johnston per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.
    Note: The name is spelled Johnson on the memorial but Johnston in the Findagrave record????
  2. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.
  3. [S128] FindAGrave, online unknown url.
  4. [S110] Unknown compiler, William Canniff.
  5. [S116] Wikipedia, online unknown url.
  6. [S54] Wilfred M. Sprung & Barbara Nyland, Tobey Book.

Sarah Ann Randolph1

F, #100422, b. circa 1792, d. 1858
  • Birth*: circa 1792; Jefferson Co., New York, U.S.A.; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1
  • Marriage*: 1807; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.; Principal=William J. Johnson1
  • Death*: 1858; Clayton, Jefferson Co., New York, U.S.A.; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1
  • Married Name: 1807; Johnson1

Family: William J. Johnson b. 1 Feb 1782, d. 17 Feb 1870

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

James Edward Jewel "Jim" Johnson1

M, #100423, b. 1808, d. 1892
  • Birth*: 1808; Upper Canada; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1
  • Death*: 1892; Jefferson Co., New York, U.S.A.; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Ann Catherine Johnson1

F, #100424, b. 2 February 1809, d. 10 September 1812
  • Birth*: 2 February 1809; Ernestown Twp., Lennox & Addington Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1
  • Death*: 10 September 1812; Kingston, Frontenac Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Adah Mariah Johnson1

F, #100425, b. 24 February 1811, d. 1899
  • Birth*: 24 February 1811; Kingston, Frontenac Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1
  • Death*: 1899; Wayne Co., Michigan, U.S.A.; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

William Peg Johnson1

M, #100426, b. 7 February 1813
  • Birth*: 7 February 1813; Ernestown Twp., Lennox & Addington Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of AlraeTurcotte on ancestry.ca, May 12, 2019.1

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.