Margaret Elizabeth Banks1

F, #105478, b. 1811, d. 13 May 1848
  • Birth*: 1811; per family tree of enoughnow on ancestry.ca, Oct 21 2020.1
  • Marriage*: 1 November 1834; Parish Chapel, St. Pancras, England; per family tree of enoughnow on ancestry.ca, Oct 21 2020.; Principal=Vincent Clementi1
  • Death*: 13 May 1848; Thacham, Berkshire, England; per family tree of enoughnow on ancestry.ca, Oct 21 2020.1
  • Married Name: 1 November 1834; Clementi1

Family: Vincent Clementi b. c 1812, d. 16 Oct 1899

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Percy H. Gillespie1

M, #105479, b. 1902
  • Birth*: 1902; Cobourg, Northumberland Co., Ontario; Date 1902 & location Cobourg per marr. reg'n.1
  • Marriage*: 27 September 1921; Toronto, York Co., Ontario; Marriage Reg'n.#005140: Groom: Percy H. Gillespie; Age: 19; Res.: 310 WEllesley St., Toronto; Born: Cobourg; Status: bachelor; Occ.: Shipper; Rel.: Pres.; Parents: Edward Gillespie & MaryJ. Anderson; Bride: Alta May Anderson; Age: 21; Res.: 120 Winchester St., Toronto; Born: Morganston; Status: spinster; Occ.: --; Rel.: Pres.; Parents: John Anderson & Emma McColl; Wit.: H. Anderson & Mabel G. Anderson, Campbellford; Date: Sep 27 1921; Place: Toronto; Performed by: D. N. Merden, Toronto, Pres.; Sworn: Toronto, Sep 17 1921; Reg'r.: H. G. Odell, Toronto (Ontario Marriage Registration, #005140?-1921, ancestry.ca); Principal=Alta May Anderson2
  • Residence*: 27 September 1921; 310 Wellesley St., Toronto, York Co., Ontario; Residence 310 Wellesley St., Toronto per marr. reg'n.1

Family: Alta May Anderson b. 30 Mar 1900

Citations

  1. [S8] Unknown author, Ontario Archives, Record Type: Microfilm.
  2. [S8] Unknown author, Ontario Archives, Record Type: Microfilm, #005140?-1921.

Edward Gillespie1

M, #105480, b. circa 1875
  • Birth*: circa 1875; per marriage reg'n. of son Percy H. Gillespie.1
  • Marriage*: circa 1898; per marriage reg'n. of son Percy H. Gillespie.; Principal=Mary J. Anderson1

Family: Mary J. Anderson b. c 1875

Citations

  1. [S8] Unknown author, Ontario Archives, Record Type: Microfilm.

Mary J. Anderson1

F, #105481, b. circa 1875
  • Birth*: circa 1875; per marriage reg'n. of son Percy H. Gillespie.1
  • Marriage*: circa 1898; per marriage reg'n. of son Percy H. Gillespie.; Principal=Edward Gillespie1
  • Married Name: circa 1898; Gillespie1

Family: Edward Gillespie b. c 1875

Citations

  1. [S8] Unknown author, Ontario Archives, Record Type: Microfilm.

Frances Mildred Anderson1

F, #105482, b. 12 February 1912, d. 20 May 2005
  • Birth*: 12 February 1912; Cramahe Twp., Northumberland Co., Ontario; per family tree of Deborah Anderson on ancestry.ca, Oct 22 2020.1
  • Marriage*: 1945; per family tree of Deborah Anderson on ancestry.ca, Oct 22 2020.; Principal=Milton Stanley Moser1
  • Death*: 20 May 2005; Exton, Chester Co., Pennsylvania, U.S.A.; per family tree of Deborah Anderson on ancestry.ca, Oct 22 2020.1
  • Married Name: 1945; Moser1

Family: Milton Stanley Moser b. 15 Aug 1907, d. 24 Jan 2005

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Milton Stanley Moser1

M, #105483, b. 15 August 1907, d. 24 January 2005
  • Birth*: 15 August 1907; Woolwich Twp., Elmira, Waterloo Co., Ontario; per family tree of Deborah Anderson on ancestry.ca, Oct 22 2020.1
  • Marriage*: 1945; per family tree of Deborah Anderson on ancestry.ca, Oct 22 2020.; Principal=Frances Mildred Anderson1
  • Death*: 24 January 2005; Exton, Chester Co., Pennsylvania, U.S.A.; per family tree of Deborah Anderson on ancestry.ca, Oct 22 2020.1

Family: Frances Mildred Anderson b. 12 Feb 1912, d. 20 May 2005

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Nellie Isabell Lock1

F, #105484, b. 14 April 1901, d. 1974
  • Birth*: 14 April 1901; Northumberland Co., Ontario; per family tree of Deborah Anderson on ancestry.ca, Oct 22 2020.1
  • Marriage*: 5 September 1925; Toronto, York Co., Ontario; per family tree of Deborah Anderson on ancestry.ca, Oct 22 2020.; Principal=Harry Milton Anderson1
  • Death*: 1974; Ontario; per family tree of Deborah Anderson on ancestry.ca, Oct 22 2020.1
  • Married Name: 5 September 1925; Anderson1

Family: Harry Milton Anderson b. 30 Mar 1900, d. 1988

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

William Allan1

M, #105485, b. 1770, d. 11 July 1853
  • Birth*: 1770; Moss near Huntly, Scotland; Date 1770 & location Moss near Huntly, Scotland per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Marriage*: 24 July 1809; Kingston, Frontenac Co., Upper Canada; "m. 24 July 1809 Leah Tyrer Gamble in Kingston, Upper Canada; per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)
    Date Jul 24 1809 & location Kingston per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.; Principal=Leah Tyrer Gamble1,2
  • Death*: 11 July 1853; Toronto, York Co., Canada West; "d. 11 July 1853 in Toronto." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)
    Date Jul 11 1853 & location Toronto per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1,2
  • Immigration*: circa 1787; Montreal, Quebec; "William Allan’s family background and early training remain obscure. His lack of formal education and bad penmanship were sufficiently marked to cause him some concern in later life. He came to Canada about 1787, probably as a clerk for Robert Ellice and Company of Montreal, which was reorganized in 1790 as Forsyth, Richardson and Company. Since the Forsyth family was from Huntly, and John Forsyth* was a partner in the Ellice firm, it may have been through this family that Allan obtained his post in Canada." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Residence*: 1789; Niagara Dist., Quebec; In 1788 or 1789 he came to Niagara (Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont.), probably as a clerk under George Forsyth, head of the firm’s branch there. An important trans-shipment centre on the route to the upper Great Lakes, Niagara provided Allan with an excellent opportunity to learn all the details of the general merchant’s operations, the Indian trade, and garrison supply." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Residence: 1795; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "In 1795 he applied for and received a town lot and an additional grant of 200 acres at Upper Canada’s new capital, York (Toronto). He moved there, becoming the local agent for Forsyth, Richardson and Company. Because of the firm’s Montreal location, excellent financial rating, and transatlantic trade connections, the agency gave Allan a lead over many rival merchants at the backwoods capital." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Residence: 1798; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "The move to York may have been something of a gamble: virtually only Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe* liked the site. But Allan’s relocation paid off. He almost immediately exchanged his town lot for a harbour-side property and in 1798 he was granted the adjoining water-lot for a wharf." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1 January 1800; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "The field of local government had quickly occupied Allan’s attention, particularly during slack seasons of trade when he had time on his hands. York formed part of the Home District, which was administered by local justices of the peace sitting in a court of quarter sessions. On 1 Jan. 1800 Allan joined their ranks and began to play a major role in district government. His work involved issuing various licences, including those for marriages and for shops and taverns." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 9 April 1800; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "He was appointed to the onerous post of district treasurer on 9 April 1800 and his name appears on commissions for various public works. On 6 August he became collector of customs at York and district inspector of flour, potash, and pearl ash. (He was particularly familiar with potash for he had erected a potashery in 1800.)" per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1801; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "As well, in 1801 he succeeded William Willcocks* as postmaster at York ... " per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note*: 1801; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "About 1797 he had formed a partnership with Alexander Wood in a general store. Wood, another Scottish emigrant, had worked for the Forsyth firm in Kingston before coming to York. The partnership lasted until 1801, when it was dissolved with some recrimination. Apparently the buildings were on Allan’s lot, for he ended up with the store and stock. As well, Allan purchased the debts due to the partnership, at what Wood claimed was far
    too low a price. Whatever the case, each went back into business for himself and both
    prospered. Most important, Allan was able to retain the agency for Forsyth, Richardson and
    Company." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1803; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "Allan was also active within York’s small social élite. During the first decade of the 1800s he gained influential friends in official quarters, including two other Scots: Inspector General of Public Accounts John McGill and Alexander Grant, the provincial administrator (1805–6),
    who for a time lived with Allan. He was an early supporter of the Church of England. He and Duncan Cameron were the treasurers for the building fund of St James’ Church in 1803 and Allan was chief custodian for the expansion of the church in 1818. At the end of his term as people’s warden, an office he held from 1807 to 1812, he welcomed a new rector, the Reverend John Strachan, another Aberdeenshire man who was to become a close friend." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1807; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "In 1807 he presided over the election of Robert Thorpe*, whose traitorous remarks he reported to Lieutenant Governor Francis Gore." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1809; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "Allan had also married, in 1809. His wife, Leah Tyrer Gamble, a daughter of a surgeon with Simcoe’s Queen’s Rangers, had wide family connections which can have done Allan’s career no harm; Samuel Smith, for example, who later became provincial administrator (1817–18, 1820), was Leah’s
    uncle. Thus, though the War of 1812 would, in some ways, be a watershed in Allan’s career, he had laid the foundations of his future activities and influence well before the war, obtaining the respect and patronage of the local and provincial governing groups and building up a prosperous business." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1811; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "As was usual at the time, he soon developed his own agencies in York’s growing hinterland centres. Although Laurent Quetton* de Saint-Georges was probably the leading merchant in York prior to the War of 1812, Allan quickly gained an excellent reputation. As the Church stated in his obituary, he “acquired the entire confidence of all classes of the community by his excellent habits of business, his punctuality in all transactions, and his perfect integrity.” Further, in May 1811, he entered into partnership with William Jarvie, forming William Allan and Company, which was dissolved in April of the following year." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: between 1812 and 1814; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "Allan had been commissioned in the Lincoln militia in 1795 and three years later his lieutenancy was transferred to the York militia. In April 1812, on the eve of the war, he was
    promoted major of the 3rd York Militia, whose territory encompassed the town and its
    environs. With the beginning of hostilities in June the regiment’s flank companies, 120 strong, entered the garrison. Allan spent the winter of 1812–13 on garrison duty and escorting prisoners to Kingston. During the first capitulation of York, in April 1813, Major-General Sir Roger Hale Shaeffe and the British regulars retreated to Kingston, leaving Allan and Lieutenant-Colonel William Chewett, as the senior militia officers, to negotiate the terms of surrender, which provided that private property was not to be touched. Allan then became a prisoner on parole. He saw his store looted, but, with John Strachan, was successful in the keeping of order in the town. Justifiably, he went down as one of the heroes of the capitulation. As a prisoner on parole Allan could not bear arms, but he was active as a government agent in curbing disloyalty and searching out enemy agents in the Home District. His zeal made a good
    impression on Judge William Dummer Powell*, an executive councillor and probably the
    leading figure in the government. Allan also impressed the Americans, who regarded him as “obnoxious,” and when the town was about to be captured for the second time, in July, he
    quickly fled. His store was looted again. The public declarations of sympathy for the enemy
    which had resulted from the occupations of York prompted such authorities as Allan and Powell to urge suppressive measures. In August, Allan, Strachan, and four others formed a committee of investigation, the findings of which led to the sentencing of such spokesmen as Elijah Bentley*. In May 1814 Allan was back on active duty after a prisoner-on-parole exchange. He saw no more action, however, although he was commander of the militia at the garrison until the fall of 1815." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1815; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "During the war Allan was kept busy with the very profitable pursuit of supplying the garrison through the office of the commissary general. In all, the commissariat paid out more than £50,000 to York merchants, most of it to Laurent Quetton de Saint-Georges and Allan. The latter received at least £12,724, which represented a mark-up of about 100 per cent. Of course he also had claims for compensation for the damage to his store during the occupations and after the war he received 1,000 acres of land under the Prince Regent’s bounty. In 1815 he took his brother-in-law John William Gamble* as a partner in the store and they were later joined by another brother-in-law, William Gamble." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1818; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "Though he was averse to seeking elective office, Allan continued and increased his early involvement in official administration. Probably because of his experience as a justice of the
    peace, in 1818 he was an associate judge along with the three justices of the Court of King’s Bench, William Dummer Powell, William Campbell, and D’Arcy Boulton, at the trial in York of two of the North West Company supporters involved with Cuthbert Grant in the murder of Governor Robert Semple at Seven Oaks (Winnipeg)." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1821; Bank of Upper Canada, York, York Co., Upper Canada; "In 1818, the year after the Bank of Montreal was founded, he became its agent in York, a position he held for three years. The success of the Bank of Montreal and the need for banking services were quickly reflected in Upper Canada, where, as early as 1817, rival groups in York and Kingston [see Thomas Markland*] had begun to contend for the first bank charter. The York group was led initially by John Strachan and Alexander Wood rather than by Allan, with his Montreal connections, but by about 1819 he had taken over the leadership. Through various complex manoeuvres in the House of Assembly and the Legislative Council, combined with the vital support of Lieutenant Governor Sir Peregrine Maitland, the York group appropriated the charter originally granted to Kingston, and in 1821 the Bank of Upper Canada was incorporated. Allan headed the subscription committee." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1822; Bank of Upper Canada, York, York Co., Upper Canada; "The bank’s first directors in 1822 included George Crookshank, Provincial Secretary Duncan Cameron, Surveyor General Thomas Ridout, Solicitor General Henry John Boulton, and John Henry Dunn in addition to Allan and John Strachan. At the election for president, there was apparently some support for both Dunn and Crookshank (who was out of the province), but because of Allan’s mercantile success, experience with the Bank of Montreal, and hard work on behalf of the new bank, the directors elected him to the office. Except for 1825–26, when he did not stand because of a trip abroad and Crookshank held the presidency, Allan was re-elected annually until his resignation in 1835. Thomas Ridout’s son, Thomas Gibbs Ridout*, became the bank’s first cashier (general manager), a position he would hold for nearly 40 years." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: July 1822; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "As a result of Allan’s increasing activity within the bank, which operated out of his store building until 1825, he sold his store interests in July 1822 to his partners, the Gambles, and “gave up all his concern in trade.”" per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: January 1823; Bank of Upper Canada, York, York Co., Upper Canad; The directorate, as William Lyon Mackenzie was constantly to remind it, comprised a “family compact” group. The reformers had early had representatives within the bank – Francis Jackson and William Warren Baldwin* – but as members of the founding group in 1821, these representatives were hardly in a position at the outset to quarrel with bank policy. The image of the bank as a government body was reinforced in January 1823 by legislation which authorized the lieutenant governor to appoint 4 of the bank’s 15 directors, of whom a large number were
    already executive or legislative councillors." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1825; Bank of Upper Canada, York, York Co., Upper Canada; "The bank, however, did not operate without internal friction. In 1825 a group headed by William Warren Baldwin and Thomas Gibbs Ridout made a determined effort to dominate the board of directors, evidently during Allan’s absence. Although the group canvassed extensively for votes, especially in Niagara and Kingston, it was soundly defeated." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William
    Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1825; Legislative Council, York, York Co., Upper Canada; "The fact that some of the offices he held enabled him to watch over his own interests may have made these services almost mandatory, but Allan’s public contributions merited recognition. His services were well appreciated within the “family compact” and in 1825 he was appointed to the Legislative Council. The following year, evidently with regard to the appointment of a new deputy postmaster general, Attorney General John Beverley Robinson remarked to John Macaulay of Kingston, “He is really so very good a man & so upright & valuable a public officer, that everyone would be reluctant as well as yourself to interfere with any expectation he might reasonably indulge.”" per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1826; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "Later, in 1826, Allan was one of the justices sitting in the trial of the rioters who had destroyed William Lyon Mackenzie’s printingpress." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1829; Bank of Upper Canada, York, York Co., Upper Canada; "Allan’s caution and sound judgement made him a very successful banker and contributed to the Bank of Upper Canada’s prosperous situation at the end of the 1820s. From 1824 it had paid annual dividends of eight per cent on paid-up capital, plus some bonuses. Following the expiry in 1829 of the note redemption act, the bank became engaged in a specie war with the Bank of Montreal, which had sent its agents back into York and Kingston, in part to take advantage of imperial spending on the Rideau Canal. Each bank purchased the other’s notes with the intention of demanding payment in specie upon presenting the notes. Allan played his cards
    boldly, sending Thomas Gibbs Ridout to Montreal to arrange weekly shipments of specie. In the end, Allan later informed Lieutenant Governor Sir John Colborne*, he and his bank “met the exigency triumphantly & were above all difficulty.” The banks reached an agreement whereby the Montreal bank withdrew all its Upper Canadian agents except Henry Dupuy at Kingston and acted as agent in Montreal for the Upper Canadian bank; Allan subsequently used his personal friendship with Peter McGill, an influential director of the Bank of Montreal, to maintain smooth relations. The Bank of Upper Canada benefited too from the increasing number of public works in the province, which were financed by government debentures. These
    were bought by the bank at six per cent and negotiated in Montreal, London, or New York.
    Early in 1833 Allan secured for the bank the business of the British Treasury in Upper Canada, including the lucrative commissarial business at Kingston." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1829; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "Allan was also in charge of the finances of such important public works as the rebuilding of the parliament houses in 1819–20. When they had to be rebuilt again after a fire, he assisted in 1826–29 in having the plans and estimates prepared. These can hardly have been profitable posts; however, when he was paymaster of the militia from 1818 to 1825, more than £28,000 passed through his hands, doubtless resulting in a fine commission. Also, he was gazetted in 1822 one of the commissioners for investigating claims for war losses and thus, with Alexander
    Wood and others, authorized the compensation for himself and his friends." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: circa 1830; Bank of Upper Canada, York, York Co., Upper Canada; "By the opening of the 1830s the bank, despite its success, was confronted with continuing internal dissent, political opposition, and new competition. In a colony that was undergoing a rapid increase in population as a result of immigration and that was heading into boom times, Allan’s strict policies on the function and expansion of the bank were becoming increasingly unpopular. As a merchant running a bank, Allan regarded it as a centre for financial transactions such as the making of loans on, or the discounting of, promissory notes and bills of exchange; the handling of coin and bullion; and the purchase and resale of government debentures." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1830; Bank of Upper Canada, York, York Co., Upper Canada; "The bank had opened agencies at Kingston (1823), Niagara (1824), Montreal (1829), and Cobourg (1830). In 1830, however, Allan advised John Macaulay, a close friend and the bank’s Kingston agent, of his preference for “keeping within bounds on the secure side,” thus avoiding too rapid growth that might later necessitate the contraction or withdrawal of agencies. Accustomed to running his own business, Allan was ready in the interest of prompt action to do what he conceived was “right & safe” without referring every decision to the directors. He could not, however, carry them on all points. He preached restraint to a board which supported his management but which, as early as 1823, contained a majority out of sympathy with his policies." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1832; Bannk of Upper Canada, York, York Co., Upper Canada; "In late 1830 Allan appears to have initiated a bid to secure government support for capitalization when he encouraged John Macaulay to discuss the matter with Peter Perry, a member of the assembly, and to “pursuade” Cartwright to write to Solicitor General Christopher Alexander Hagerman, presumably to find a resolution to the political impasse. Two years later bills of incorporation, for the Commercial Bank of the Midland District, and capitalization, for the Bank of Upper Canada, were passed. In contrast to Allan, John Strachan, who no longer sat on the board but reflected the thinking of many directors, did not fully recognize a need to
    relate paper to metallic currency; he argued for the careful expansion of the Bank of Upper
    Canada but believed that Allan’s inhibitions had hurt it." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1832; York, York Co., Upper Canada; "Meanwhile, Allan was becoming progressively more dissatisfied in the bank. In 1832 death in his family and his own serious illness had left him “very much depressed.” He pondered about building a small cottage and taking a trip abroad, and suggested that “if spared” he would in a year’s time have “left all this,” including the bank, “for others.” He rallied, but felt increasingly isolated within a bank board which, he confided to John Macaulay, no longer supported him fully and undervalued his service." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1833; Bank of Upper Canada, York, York Co., Upper Canada; "Allan decried his associates’ involvement with speculative ventures. His pessimism was on occasion borne out, as in the reckless entrepreneurial practices and financial collapse in 1833 of James Gray Bethune*, the bank’s cashier at Cobourg. Losses resulting from such
    failures were absorbed without harm to the bank’s reputation. But even the success of the bank became controversial, and serious discontent developed among businessmen who wanted to break the banking monopoly of the York élite and to use the bank more as a source of investment capital." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1835; Bank of Upper Canada, York, York Co., Upper Canada; "During the winter of 1834–35 Allan was equally frustrated in his dealings with the government. He believed the connection had outlived its usefulness to the bank, but Lieutenant Governor Colborne and the government directors had blocked his attempt to have the government’s shares sold, thus forcing him to face continued criticism from the bank’s political opponents. His objections to John Henry Dunn’s plan to circumvent the bank by selling debentures directly on the British market were also set aside. Allan had argued that if the interest on the debentures was paid in Upper Canada, capital and capitalists would be attracted to the colony. As well, he knew that the position of the Bank of Upper Canada as the intermediary for such internal financing would be altered if, along the lines of Dunn’s plan, interest was paid in England. Weary of the struggle, he resigned as president in 1835." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Residence: 1835; Canada Company, Toronto, York Co., Upper Canada; "As well, from about 1834 and possibly earlier, the Canada Company's offices in York were housed in premises owned by Allan." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2
  • Note: 1835; Bank of Upper Canada, York, York Co., Upper Canada; "Once the Kingston bank was chartered, Allan had informed William Hamilton Merritt in December 1831, “common Justice” must open the door to others and he promised to support
    Merritt’s proposal for a bank at St Catharines and “all future applications that appear reasonable.” By 1834 the Bank of Upper Canada itself had established new branches, at Hamilton and Brockville, as well as agencies at Amherstburg, Penetanguishene, Prescott, and Bytown (Ottawa). Private partnership banks were also making their appearance, one of which, George Truscott's Agricultural Bank, opened in Toronto in 1834 and paid interest on deposits, thus setting a controversial precedent which other institutions followed of necessity. Allan deeply distrusted Truscott and his methods of banking, and the two soon became locked in a specie war. Truscott, who had heard rumours that Allan’s board did not support his campaign wholeheartedly, characterized the Bank of Upper Canada in 1835 as a “discreet old lady” and attacked the integrity of its president with biting sarcasm." per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)2

Family: Leah Tyrer Gamble b. 26 Jul 1790, d. 17 Oct 1848

  • Marriage*: 24 July 1809; Kingston, Frontenac Co., Upper Canada; "m. 24 July 1809 Leah Tyrer Gamble in Kingston, Upper Canada; per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)
    Date Jul 24 1809 & location Kingston per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.; Principal=Leah Tyrer Gamble1,2

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.
  2. [S129] Dictionary Cdn BIOs, online unknown url.

Leah Tyrer Gamble1

F, #105486, b. 26 July 1790, d. 17 October 1848
  • Birth*: 26 July 1790; Prince William, York Co., New Brunswick; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Marriage*: 24 July 1809; Kingston, Frontenac Co., Upper Canada; "m. 24 July 1809 Leah Tyrer Gamble in Kingston, Upper Canada; per Dictionary of Canadian Biography - William Allan (www.biographi.ca/en/bio/allan_william_8E.html)
    Date Jul 24 1809 & location Kingston per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.; Principal=William Allan1,2
  • Death*: 17 October 1848; Moss Park, Toronto, York Co., Canada West; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Married Name: 24 July 1809; Allan1

Family: William Allan b. 1770, d. 11 Jul 1853

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.
  2. [S129] Dictionary Cdn BIOs, online unknown url.

John Gamble1

M, #105487, b. 1755, d. 2 September 1811
  • Birth*: 1755; Fermanagh Co., Ireland; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Marriage*: 18 May 1784; Maugerville, New Brunswick, Canada; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.; Principal=Isabella Elizabeth Clarke1
  • Death*: 2 September 1811; Kingston, Frontenac Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1

Family: Isabella Elizabeth Clarke b. 24 Oct 1767, d. 9 Mar 1859

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Isabella Elizabeth Clarke1

F, #105488, b. 24 October 1767, d. 9 March 1859
  • Birth*: 24 October 1767; Stratford, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, U.S.A.; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Marriage*: 18 May 1784; Maugerville, New Brunswick, Canada; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.; Principal=John Gamble1
  • Death*: 9 March 1859; Toronto, York Co., Canada West; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Married Name: 18 May 1784; Gamble1

Family: John Gamble b. 1755, d. 2 Sep 1811

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Mary Ann MacAulay1

F, #105489, b. 15 February 1801, d. 23 February 1833
  • Birth*: 15 February 1801; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Marriage*: circa 1830; Upper Canada; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.; Principal=John William Gamble1
  • Death*: 23 February 1833; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Married Name: circa 1830; Gamble1

Family: John William Gamble b. 5 Jul 1799, d. 12 Dec 1874

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

John William Gamble1

M, #105490, b. 5 July 1799, d. 12 December 1874
  • Birth*: 5 July 1799; York, York Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Marriage*: circa 1830; Upper Canada; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.; Principal=Mary Ann MacAulay1
  • Death*: 12 December 1874; Pine Grove, Vaughan, York Co., Ontario; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1

Family: Mary Ann MacAulay b. 15 Feb 1801, d. 23 Feb 1833

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

William Gamble1

M, #105491, b. 5 August 1805, d. 20 March 1881
  • Birth*: 5 August 1805; Kingston, Frontenac Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Death*: 20 March 1881; Etobicoke, York Co., Ontario; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Harriet Eliza Boulton1

F, #105492, b. 22 February 1820, d. 7 August 1893
  • Birth*: 22 February 1820; York, York Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Marriage*: 22 May 1843; St. James Anglican Cathedral, Toronto, York Co., Canada West; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.; Principal=Joseph Clarke Gamble1
  • Death*: 7 August 1893; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Married Name: 22 May 1843; Gamble1

Family: Joseph Clarke Gamble b. 20 Nov 1808, d. 23 Nov 1902

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Joseph Clarke Gamble1

M, #105493, b. 20 November 1808, d. 23 November 1902
  • Birth*: 20 November 1808; Kingston, Frontenac Co., Upper Canada; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Marriage*: 22 May 1843; St. James Anglican Cathedral, Toronto, York Co., Canada West; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.; Principal=Harriet Eliza Boulton1
  • Death*: 23 November 1902; Toronto, York Co., Ontario; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1

Family: Harriet Eliza Boulton b. 22 Feb 1820, d. 7 Aug 1893

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Adelaide Harriet Schreiber1

F, #105494, b. 29 October 1835, d. 1908
  • Birth*: 29 October 1835; Bradwell on Sea, Essex, England; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Marriage*: 27 May 1857; Saint James, Westminseter, London, England; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.; Principal=George William Allan1
  • Death*: 1908; Toronto, York Co., Ontario; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Married Name: 27 May 1857; Allan1

Family: George William Allan b. 1822, d. 24 Jul 1902

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Rev. Thomas Schreiber1

M, #105495, b. 17 October 1794, d. 15 January 1873
  • Birth*: 17 October 1794; Wickham Market, Suffolk, England; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Marriage*: 10 November 1825; St. George, Hanover Sqaure, London, England; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.; Principal=Sarah Bingham1
  • Death*: 15 January 1873; Ipswich, Suffolk, England; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1

Family: Sarah Bingham b. 20 Jun 1804, d. 15 Mar 1856

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Sarah Bingham1

F, #105496, b. 20 June 1804, d. 15 March 1856
  • Birth*: 20 June 1804; Bombay, Maharashtra, India; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Marriage*: 10 November 1825; St. George, Hanover Sqaure, London, England; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.; Principal=Rev. Thomas Schreiber1
  • Death*: 15 March 1856; Toronto, York Co., Canada West; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Married Name: 10 November 1825; Schreiber1

Family: Rev. Thomas Schreiber b. 17 Oct 1794, d. 15 Jan 1873

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.

Vice Admiral Joseph Bingham R.N.1

M, #105497, b. circa 1769, d. 10 December 1825
  • Birth*: circa 1769; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1
  • Marriage*: 13 April 1797; Saint Martin in hte Fields, Westminster, London, England; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.; Principal=SaraH Parker1
  • Death*: 10 December 1825; Mayfair, Middlesex Co., England; per family tree of Joanne Doucette, Oct 23 2020.1

Family: SaraH Parker b. 1774, d. Mar 1856

Citations

  1. [S82] Tree on Ancestry.com, online unknown url.